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Parents & Young People

There can be a difference in the behaviour and side effects seen in teenagers when they drink alcohol because teenager’s brains are still developing which can result in negative effects in the short and long-term.

In March 2009, the National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC) released the Australian Guidelines to Reduce Health Risks from Drinking Alcohol. The 2009 Guidelines focus on health risks accumulating over a lifetime from alcohol use.

Guidelines 3A and 3B provide guidelines for reducing risk to those under 18-years-of-age:

GUIDELINE 3A - REDUCE RISK TO THOSE UNDER 18 YEARS OF AGE
Parents and carers should be advised that children under 15-years-of-age are at the greatest risk of harm from drinking and that for this age group, not drinking alcohol is especially important.

GUIDELINE 3B - REDUCE RISK TO THOSE UNDER 18 YEARS OF AGE
For young people aged 15 to 17 years, the safest option is to delay the initiation of drinking for as long as possible.

 
References

1 National Health and Medical Research Council (2009). Australian guidelines to reduce health risks from drinking alcohol: Commonwealth of Australia. Available at http://www.nhmrc.gov.au/guidelines/publications/ds10

In this section
What Parents Need to Know

The NHMRC alcohol guidelines for young people give a sound and important reason not to give alcohol to your child if they are under 18 years of age.

Young People and Alcohol Laws

Secondary supply laws came into effect on 20 November 2015. There are also other alcohol laws for under 18s on licensed premises.

Your Child And Leavers

Leavers is a celebratory period at the end of year 12 exams in WA. It is likely that your child will be in an environment where alcohol is consumed.

What Young People Need to Know

Concerns about the risks of alcohol for young people led to the NHMRC recommending: For young people under 18 years of age, no alcohol is the safest choice.

Alcohol and Young People

There can be a difference in the behaviour and side effects seen in teenagers when they drink alcohol because teenager’s brains are still developing which can result in negative effects in the short and long term.

Alcohol and the Developing Brain

Alcohol can affect a child’s developing brain negatively impacting on their problem solving skills, performance at school, body, mood and mental health