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Tolerance of Drunken Behaviour

The Tolerance of Drunken Behaviour ‘Wheelchair’ campaign was first launched in September 2010, with the aim to decrease the problems that result from drinking too much on one occasion and tolerating drunken behaviour.

The key messages of the campaign were:

  • Tolerating drunken behaviour can have serious consequences.
  • There are a range of problems that may occur as a result of drinking too much on one occasion including (but not limited to) falls, burns, pedestrian injuries, assault, road traffic injuries. 1
  • It is everyone’s responsibility to discourage drunken behaviour to prevent alcohol-related harm among drunk people and those around them.
  • Harmful alcohol use is supported by some social customs and environments that make alcohol available and affordable.

The campaign was a joint initiative of the Drug and Alcohol Office (DAO) and the Injury Control Council of WA (ICCWA).

Target group

20 to 29 year old men and women, as the latest data shows that this group in particular are drinking at risky levels in terms of both short-term and long-term harm.

Objectives

To increase awareness amongst the community that:

  • There are a range of problems that may occur as a result of drinking too much on one occasion including (but not limited to): falls, burns, pedestrian injuries, assault, road traffic injuries
  • It is everyone’s responsibility to discourage drunken behaviour to prevent alcohol-related harm among drunk people and those around them
  • Harmful alcohol use is supported by some social customs and environments that make alcohol available and affordable
  • Putting up with drunken behaviour can have serious consequences.

Evaluation

Evaluation of the campaign found that:

  • Prompted recognition of the campaign was relatively high at 53% of respondents recalling the campaign when prompted
  • Correct message takeout was reasonably good with two out of three respondents taking out correct messages
  • 81% of respondents felt the messages were believable
  • Perceptions of the perceived likelihood of negative consequences occurring as a result of getting drunk increased significantly since the previous evaluation.

Resources

Campaign Video 30 second television commercial

45 second television commercial

Related Information

Alcohol & Your Health

Harmful drinking can occur in the short-term and long-term. NHMRC released guidelines that give advice on minimising health consequences of drinking alcohol.


Immediate and Short-Term Effects

The most apparent immediate effects of alcohol impact the brain. The first effects include feelings of relaxation and loss of inhibitions.


Alcohol and Short-Term Harm

The short terms effects of alcohol can not only impact the individual, but also loved ones, friends and members of the community.


Alcohol and Injury

Some of the problems caused by drinking too much on one occasion includes injury, violence, falls, anti-social behaviour and problems with friends and family.


References

1 Epidemiology Branch, Department of Health Western Australia. WA Hospital Morbidity and Mortality Data Systems (2004-2008), ABS Morbidity and Mortality Data (1998-2007). Retrieved on August 3 2010.