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Kit Resources

Alcohol and Young People (12-17 yrs) – Infographic A3 size Link

Alcohol and Young People: Tips for Parents of 12-17 year olds – A4 flyer Link

Alcohol.Think Again Jpeg Images (10 different images) Link

School Ball Parent Agreement Letter Template Link

Newsletter Article – Alcohol Education: At school and at homeLink

Frequently Asked Questions – Alcohol Guidelines

  1. What are the Guidelines for young people regarding alcohol? Link
  2. Why have these alcohol Guidelines for young people been introduced? Link

Frequently Asked Questions Alcohol Laws – Licensed Premises/Private Settings

  1. What are the laws in Western Australia about alcohol and young people? Link
  2. Are there laws about young people drinking at home? Link
  3. Do other adults need verbal permission from me to give my child alcohol or do they need to have my permission in writing? Link
  4. I am having a party at home for my son’s 18th birthday and some of the people attending will be under 18 years of age. Is it okay for me to give them alcohol if they have a note from one of their parent’s giving permission? Link
  5. I am having a small gathering at my home for my daughter’s 18th birthday. A few of her friends haven’t turned 18 yet; is it okay for me to serve them alcohol if one of their parents ring me and gives their permission over the phone or provides permission by text? Link
  6. My son, who is 17, was given alcohol by his 17 year old friend while visiting his house. Doesn’t his friend need to get my permission before he can do that? Link
  7. My daughter is having her 18th birthday party at home. One of her 17 year old friends told me that her mother had given her permission to drink alcohol. Is it okay for me to give her a drink in my house? Link
  8. If a young person who is not yet 18 years of age brings their own alcohol to my house, is this an offence under the new secondary supply of alcohol law? Link
  9. I am taking my daughter and a few of her friends out to dinner for her 18th birthday. One girl is not 18 yet. If she has, her parents’ permission is it okay for me to give her alcohol at the restaurant? Link
  10. Is it okay for other family members to give my child sips of alcohol at a family gathering, without my permission, if it’s in a private home? Link
  11. My 17 year old daughter is going out with an 18 year old and I don’t want her to drink. How do I make this clear to her boyfriend? Link
  12. My 18 year old son is having some friends over to our house for a few drinks while we are not at home. Some of my son’s friends are not 18 yet. Is it okay for him to give them alcohol? Link

Frequently Asked Questions – Alcohol Harms

  1. What are the short and long-term harms of alcohol for young people? Link
  2. What harmful behaviours can occur when young people drink alcohol? Link
  3. What are the impacts of alcohol on the developing brain? Link

Frequently Asked Questions – Questions Commonly Asked By Parents

  1. I’m concerned about sending my child to parties where alcohol may be available. What can I do? Link
  2. Don’t most parents give their children alcohol? I want to help my teenager fit in, so I don’t want them to be the only one at the party who is not drinking. Link
  3. I drank alcohol when I was young and I’m okay. So why is it different for young people now? Link
  4. How can parents influence the behaviour and choices that their children make about alcohol? – Avoid providing alcohol. Link
  5. How can parents influence the behaviour and choices that their children make about alcohol? – Discuss alcohol with your children. Link
  6. How can parents influence the behaviour and choices that their children make about alcohol? – Exposure to people drinking alcohol. Link
  7. My children are going to start drinking sooner or later. Isn’t it better to let them drink at home while I supervise them? Link

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In this section
Alcohol Use Statistics

Research has conclusively shown that hazardous and harmful alcohol use in Australia results in high economic and social costs to the community.

Responsible Service of Alcohol

The Responsible Service of Alcohol Campaign aims to increase community understanding of the legal requirements of responsible service in licensed premises.

Alcohol & the Workplace

Alcohol contributes to significant health, social and economic costs for workplaces. Preventing alcohol-related harm provides benefits for employers and employees.

How Schools Can Engage Parents in Alcohol Education

Alcohol education that provides consistent messages about alcohol, at school and by parents, can help to reduce alcohol-related harm among young people in a school community.