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How Schools Can Engage Parents in Alcohol Education

Alcohol and Health
Alcohol and your health statistics infographic

What parents do, how they communicate their expectations and whether they supply alcohol can influence their child’s choices about alcohol. 1

Programs that teach about alcohol at school and help inform parents about alcohol-related harm and the influence they can have on their child’s drinking intentions or behaviours should be part of a comprehensive approach to preventing and reducing alcohol-related harm. 22

Schools are in a position to have what they teach at school reinforced at home by providing parents with some key information that will equip parents to continue discussion about alcohol at home and to understand the reasons why no one should supply alcohol to under 18’s. 16

A ‘Parent Engagement Kit for Secondary Schools - Working with parents to reduce alcohol-related harm among young people’ has been developed, to assist secondary school communities to deliver key information about alcohol to parents/guardians of 12 to 17 year olds to encourage them to continue educating and talking with their children about alcohol.

These materials can be easily downloaded from the Kit Resources folder below.

For help with implementing strategies outlined in the kit please contact either the:

Kit Resources

 
References

1Allsop, S 2012. How to set teens up for a healthy relationship with alcohol, The Conversation, 15 June 2012, viewed 2 December 2015. Link

2Australian National Preventive Health Agency 2012, Alcohol advertising: The effectiveness of current regulatory codes in addressing community concerns, Canberra.

3Bava, S & Tapert, S 2010, Adolescent Brain Development and the Risk for Alcohol and Other Drug Problems, Neuropsychology review, vol. 20, no.4,pp.398-41.

4Bridle, R, Goggin, L, & Christou, A 2012, Alcohol Trends in Western Australia: ASSAD Survey 2011, Brief communication. no.6, Drug and Alcohol Office, Perth

5Brown, A & Tapert, S 2004, Adolescence and the Trajectory of Alcohol Use: Basic to Clinical Studies, Annals New York Academy of Sciences, vol.1021, pp. 234-244.

6Chikritzhs, T, Pascal, R & Jones P 2004, Under-Aged Drinking Among 14-17 Year Olds and Related Harms in Australia, National Alcohol Indicators Bulletin No. 7, National Drug Research Institute, Curtin University of Technology, Perth.

7Commissioner for Children and Young People 2011. Speaking Out About Reducing Alcohol-Related Harm 2011, viewed 2 December 2015. Link

8Department of Education and Early Childhood Development 2012, Fact sheet 1 – Alcohol and adolescent development, State Government of Victoria, viewed 2 December 2015. Link

9Department of the Premier and Cabinet 2000, The Liquor Control Act 1988, 20 November 2015, Government of Western Australia.

10Beecroft, M 2015, email, 23 November

11Drug and Alcohol Office and Department for Communities Office for Youth 2012, ‘Hosting a Party for Teenagers’, Drug and Alcohol Office and Department for Communities Office for Youth, Perth.booklet.

12Gilligan, C, Kypri, K, Johnson, N, Lynagh, M & Love, S 2012, ‘Parental supply of alcohol and adolescent risky drinking’ Drug and Alcohol Review, vol. 31, pp754-762.

13Hayes, L., Smart, D., Toumbourou, J.W., and Sanson, A. (2004). Parenting influences on adolescent alcohol use. Australian Institute of Family Studies. Research Report no. 10, November 2014.Toumbourou. J (Professor and Chair in Health Psychology at Deakin University), unpublished 2010.

14Hickie, I.B., & Whitwell, B,G. (2009). Alcohol and The Teenage Brain: Safest to keep them apart. BMRI Monograph 2009-2. Brain & Mind Research Institute, Sydney.

15International Agency for Research on Cancer. Monographs on the evaluation of carcinogenic risks to humans: alcohol drinking. Volume 44. Lyon: IARC. 1988.

16Jackson, L, Barnett, N, Colby, S & Rogers, M 2015, ‘The Prospective Association Between Sipping Alcohol by the Sixth Grade and Later Substance Use’, Journal of Studies on Alcohol and Drugs’ vol. 76, pp.10.

17Jones, SC 2015, ‘Don’t adjust your set – this is reality: Addressing community misconceptions about underage drinking’, in possession of the author, Australian catholic University, Melbourne.

18Kodjo et al (2004) as cited in National Health and Medical Research Council. Australian guidelines to reduce health risks from drinking alcohol. Commonwealth of Australia. (2009)

19Monti P, Miranda R, Nixon K, Sher K, Swartzwelder H, Tapert S, White A, Crews F. Adolescence: Booze, Brains, and Behavior. Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research 2010; 29(2):207–220.

20National Drug Research Institute (2007).Restrictions on the sale and supply of alcohol: Evidence and outcomes. Perth: National Drug Research Institute, Curtin University of Technology.

21National Health and Medical Research Council. (2009). Australian guidelines to reduce health risks from drinking alcohol (NHMRC). Commonwealth of Australia. Link

22Roche, A., Bywood, P., Borlagdan,J., Lunnay, B., Freeman, T., Lawton, L., Tovell, A., & Nicholas, R. (2007). Young people & alcohol: the role of cultural influences. National Centre for Education and Training on Addiction, Adelaide.

23Toumbourou. J (Professor and Chair in Health Psychology at Deakin University), unpublished 2010.

24Weitzman (2004) as cited in National Health and Medical Research Council. Australian guidelines to reduce health risks from drinking alcohol. Commonwealth of Australia. (2009)

25White, J. Adolescence, Alcohol and Brain Development, What is the impact on well-being and learning? [Presentation] Drug and Alcohol Services, South Australia.

26Windle, M., (2004) as cited in National Health and Medical Research Council. Australian guidelines to reduce health risks from drinking alcohol. Commonwealth of Australia. (2009)

27World Cancer Research Fund and American Institute for Cancer Research. Food, nutrition, physical activity and the prevention of cancer: a global perspective. Washington DC: AICR. 2007.